Home > Uncategorized > László Kövér’s interview: On national survival and struggle (II)

László Kövér’s interview: On national survival and struggle (II)

July 11, 2012

After questions about antisemitism and the attempt to rebury József Nyirő it was inevitable that the conversation would turn to Romania and eventually to the Hungarian minorities and their parties in the neighboring countries.

Kövér seems to be especially attached to Transylvania, which he visits as often as he can. He developed a particularly close relationship with Jenő Szász, the chairman of the Magyar Polgári Párt (Partidul Civic Maghiar), established in 2004. MPP is not exactly a success story, but it is perhaps the most nationalistic of the three Hungarian parties in Romania. Therefore, it is not surprising that László Kövér, representing the right wing of Fidesz, accepted the position of honorary chairman for life.

The second party is the newly formed Erdélyi Magyar Néppárt (Partidul Popular Maghiar din Transilvania) that seems to be supported by Viktor Orbán. The chairman of the party is Tibor Toro, while the idea of a new party came from László Tőkés, a close associate of Orbán and currently one of the deputy speakers of the European Parliament.  Support for it is also minimal.

The important Hungarian party in Romania is the Romániai Magyar Demokrata Szövetség (Uniunea Democrată Magiară din România or Democratic Union of Hungarians in Romania). It was founded in late 1989, immediately after the fall of communism in Romania. From 1996 to 2008 RMDSZ was a member or a supporter of every government. After the 2008 elections the party was in opposition, but at the end of 2009 it became once again a member of the government coalition. Thus, RMDSZ has played an important part in Romanian politics. Leaders of the party often filled important government positions, including the post of deputy prime minister, and therefore the party was instrumental in achieving concessions from the Romanian majority. RMDSZ is a right of center party.

RMDSZ flag
László Kövér saw red

So, let’s see what László Kövér thinks of RMDSZ. Kövér is convinced that “RMDSZ is a party whose roots go back to Bolshevism.” No wonder that the leaders of RMDSZ get along so well with the politicians of MSZP. After all “they share the same morality, the same mentality, and their interests are also the same.” Both parties “are controlled from ‘the outside’ and both aim at turning the Transylvanian Hungarians away from Budapest as their point of political orientation.”

Let’s stop here for a minute. Accusing RMDSZ of Bolshevik roots and equating it with the equally Bolshevik MSZP only shows where László Kövér stands politically. And what does Kövér mean by saying that these two parties are controlled from “the outside,” placing the words between quotation marks? Does it mean “abroad”?  Most likely. Does it mean that MSZP is controlled by Western European and American liberal circles while RMDSZ is controlled by MSZP, located outside of Romania in Hungary? Does it also mean that these two parties are in cahoots against Fidesz? Also possible.

At this point the reporter for Magyar Hírlap interjected that in this case Kövér and Zsolt Németh, undersecretary of the Hungarian Foreign Ministry, don’t see eye to eye. After all, Németh only a few days ago suggested that past grievances be put aside, and he offered a new beginning of cooperation with RMDSZ and Most-Híd, the Slovak-Hungarian party. Kövér, however, maintained that “perhaps I’m behind but as far as I know the Hungarian government’s official point of view” is not that of Zsolt Németh. He reiterated, however, that RMDSZ is the “legitimate representative of the Transylvanian Hungarians and therefore the Hungarian government will maintain a partnership with it.”

However, the sins of RMDSZ are manifold. “Among the post-Soviet countries from the Baltic to the Balkans RMDSZ is the party that spent the longest period of time as part of a ruling coalition and therefore its ‘high officers’ who have been successfully integrated into the Romanian political elite are responsible for the dramatic decrease of the Transylvanian Hungarian population, for its increasing economic and social insignificance, for the constant  questioning and whittling of its political rights, and for thwarting its desire for autonomy.”

Certainly, a party that has been part of government coalitions of another country cannot be the true representative of “the Hungarian nation that, although it lives under the suzerainty of different countries, forms an organic unit.” In Kövér’s eyes members of the nation who live outside of Hungary cannot have different interests depending on locality. There are political scientists and historians even in “the institutions of the Fidesz government” who claim that the Hungarian nation shows signs of divergence. Such a view leads directly to the next step: “Budapest should no longer tell the Hungarian politicians in the neighboring countries what to do and vice versa.” In brief, “we should at last forget the past and each other.” Certain Hungarian politicians in the neighboring countries for personal advantage or for the sake of compromise sacrifice the goals and unity of the national strategy. “These people, representing the interests of their masters, fill the role of overseers among the Hungarians who are in a hostage situation.” As for Most-Híd in Slovakia, it is not even a Hungarian party. “It is a Slovak party that shows some interest in Hungarian questions.”

So, what did we learn from Kövér’s interview about his views on the Hungarian minority question in the neighboring countries? Cooperation between Hungarians and Romanians or Hungarians and Slovaks is unacceptable. The Hungarian minorities should in no way try to accommodate and support any Romanian or Slovak government. They should stay apart, following a “national strategy” dictated from Budapest. But such cooperation between the Hungarian parties and the Budapest government is acceptable only if Fidesz is in power. Both the RMDSZ and Most-Híd are unacceptable because they accept that for almost one hundred years they have been living not in Hungary but in Romania or Slovakia. And that is a mortal sin, as far as Kövér is concerned. His national strategy seems to mean a constant struggle between Hungarians and Romanians and/or Slovaks.

Kövér advocates an ongoing struggle for national survival. Every Hungarian politician in a neighboring country who is ready to cooperate with the majority is a traitor. Just as József Nyirő described the struggle between ethnic Hungarians and Romanians in that Transylvanian village at the turn of the twentieth century so Kövér sees the situation of the Hungarians in Romania today. There can be no compromise, no cooperation because that would mean the death of the nation. Today, just as a hundred and ten years ago, there is a fierce struggle for the survival of part of the unitary nation that is the hostage of foreigners. No wonder that László Kövér thinks so highly of Nyirő.

About these ads
  1. July 11, 2012 at 8:48 pm | #1

    I’m really glad that Kover got a taste of the two thirds in Romania (the RMDSZ actually enjoys more the 66% support). How do you like them apples? The reporters should have asked how does it feel to be rejected by those he wanted to “unite” with. I guess it hit him hard because he doesn’t care to be nice anymore. Bolsheviks, working for foreign interest. That’s it. This is like trying to go out with a girl and when you get rejected you call her a whore. “I just wanted to get in you pants!” Same thing when he got kicked out of Israel he goes “Yeah? I didn’t want to go anyway!”. Like a 5 year old.

    If you speak Hungarian here is a very good web site edited by Hungarians from Szekelyudvarhely or Odorheiu Secuiesc in Romanian. This short, very cheeky article below calls Kover’s trip to Romania a visit to a political amusement park. The title is “We’re gonna win the asshole competition”. The tongue in cheek post basically says we have enough trouble we don’t need more a-holes from Budapest.

    http://manna.ro/velemeny/megnyerjuk-a-seggfejversenyt-2012-07-04.html

  2. Karl Pfeifer
    July 12, 2012 at 1:36 am | #2

    Thank you Mutt Damon. Good to know, that most Hungarians in Slovakia, Romania and Serbia can’t be deceived by the Pied Piper coming from Budapest.

  3. Martin Eden
    July 12, 2012 at 3:51 am | #3

    “are responsible for the dramatic decrease of the Transylvanian Hungarian population, for its increasing economic and social insignificance, for the constant questioning and whittling of its political rights, and for thwarting its desire for autonomy.”

    Actually, very similar arguments are used by Budapest now in the Slovak case.
    I am not much in the picture about Transylvania, but in the Slovak case it is very interesting phenomena of growing social and economic disparities. Rural areas (where most Hungarians live) are turning into zones of deindustrialization and poverty. Agriculture, once strong economic base of the people is decreasing in the importance (partly due to free trade, centralised supermarkets etc). The basic copying strategy (not only of Hungarians) is migration. E.g., there are about 300 000 mostly young Slovak citizens who left the country in the recent years. The situation where economic trends transform into increasing polarisation and nationalism is not something brand new here in Europe.

  4. LwiiH
    July 12, 2012 at 4:22 am | #4

    Martin Eden :
    E.g., there are about 300 000 mostly young Slovak citizens who left the country in the recent years. The situation where economic trends transform into increasing polarisation and nationalism is not something brand new here in Europe.

    Gosh… do you mean to say that people are looking to better their lives by moving to places where there is better opportunity? Why don’t they move to Hungary?

  5. Some1
    July 12, 2012 at 9:32 am | #5

    Few things I already believed of was confirmed by Magyar Hirlap with their interview with Kover. He is not the independent speaker of the house he should be, He has similar phobias and psychological problems (we are attacked by foreign forces) like Orban and he certainly does not represent the best interest of all Hungarians for the current times.
    I feel like that for the last two years I am watching Back to the Future’s Hungarian version, Back to the Past. Fidesz is visiting Hungary from the past, and they try to shape things for the early twentieth century with total ignorance and cluelessness of the last hundred years. My only hope that it ends well, and they can repair their time machine and go back to the past.

  6. enufff
    July 12, 2012 at 10:06 am | #6

    LwiiH :


    Gosh… do you mean to say that people are looking to better their lives by moving to places where there is better opportunity? Why don’t they move to Hungary?

    They are desperate but they are not stupid ! :D

    Anyway, Rózsa Hoffman has this advice for the young

    “Let [the new constitution] encourage you to be loyal to your country even though it is not easy to live here and the temptation to leave [Hungary] for wealth and an unimpeded career is big.”

    source : http://www.politics.hu/20120711/quotable-rozsa-hoffmans-advice-to-high-school-graduates-considering-leaving-hungary/

    I mean, so much for convincing the young to stay. Anyone who has any skill and talent would want to leave this country ; however, it doesn’t mean they are disloyal to the country !

    BTW, it seems these grads. will receive a letter + a copy of basic law of Hungary (90,000 pax * HUF10,000/copy). So, I wonder whose friend in the govt. got awarded with the printing contract.

  7. Csoda. Kegy
    July 12, 2012 at 10:57 am | #7

    It would be nice to think that people like Kövér will come to realise that Magyars and Szekelys in Transylvania share as much mutual love of their kin in Budapest as Romanians in Transylvania do of their kin in Bucharest. Not so much and certainly less than irrendists would like, as far as I can tell. Having a foreign President for Life will not help MPP and it can only serve to divide further a people who have difficulty speaking with one voice.

  8. July 12, 2012 at 11:17 am | #8

    enufff :

    LwiiH :

    BTW, it seems these grads. will receive a letter + a copy of basic law of Hungary (90,000 pax * HUF10,000/copy). So, I wonder whose friend in the govt. got awarded with the printing contract.

    They already did. But they didn’t get the A3 format, that’s the supposedly 10000 HUF “value”. They received the cheapo A4 format. The one they received isn’t up to date. Several things are changed – notably the part that guarantees Pal Schmitt’s lifetime payoff. Lots of students are trying to get rid of it. On the auction sites you can buy a copy the “book” . I’m not sure calorific calorific value. Too bad it’s not a roll …

    But the empire stroke back …

    The benching law for grad students went into effect. Those who received financial support from the government will have to stay in the country for twice the time of their studies during 20 years fallowing graduation.

    This is again very typical thing – the unorthodox Hungarian way. Things that otherwise would make sense – debatable of course – that is requiring financial contribution for public higher education are screwed up. Instead of charging tuition and giving subsidized loans based strictly on needs, they do this. Again the common denominator is the dreaded M word. MUNKA (work). Establishing the rules and the infrastructure for a robust student loan system – that would be awful lot of effort. Instead there was a government decree which was rejected by the constitutional court. No can do. Need a law. Typical FIDESZ solution. No problemo – they pushed through a law in a few hours in the parliament.

    The law that allows cops stopping children on the street is also in effect now. If the child has no written permission from a parent or the school they can be arrested and taken to the principal. I understand that truancy is a big problem but stupidity perhaps bigger. The bill by the way was sponsored by Sándor Pintér, minister of interior, ex-diesel oil mafia crook. This will have no practical effect at all. Cops will not be willing to humiliate themselves, I’m sure. This will just enforce the totalitarian feeling, like in the Kadar era, when always you had to prove anything to the cops not the other way around.

Comments are closed.
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,209 other followers

%d bloggers like this: