Ferenc Gyurcsány and the hunger strike: Media reactions

I just finished reading approximately 100 articles on the topic of the week-long hunger strike of four members of the Demokratikus Koalíció leadership. DK is the newest political party in Hungary and at present is the smallest, a couple of percentage points below LMP according to the latest public opinion polls. The hunger strike was announced by Ferenc Gyurcsány, former prime minister of Hungary and chairman of DK, on a talk show on TV2 last night.

Seven Days for Free Elections / Index /photo István Huszti

Apparently the presidium of DK  made the decision to have four of its leading politicians stage a hunger strike in front of the parliament building: Ferenc Gyurcsány, Csaba Molnár, Péter Niedermüller, and István Kolber. The four men will survive on water and tea. They set up four tents for sleeping purposes and a fifth, a kind of a living room, where friends and supporters can visit them. This hunger strike will cost DK 130,000 forints, the fee Parliament’s office headed by László Kövér charges for the use of that particular part of Kossuth Square.

The four men’s decision to stage a hunger strike was prompted by the extreme danger they see in the Orbán government’s plan to introduce a registration procedure into the Hungarian election system. Up until now the election commission has been responsible for keeping an accurate list of all eligible voters, and apparently the commission’s record has been good. Therefore registration over and above a centrally prepared electoral list seems superfluous and can serve only one purpose: to limit the number of active voters.

Although the question of registration has been discussed back and forth in the media since late May, Ferenc Gyurcsány believes that the Hungarian public is not aware of the great danger registration would pose to Hungarian democracy. Extreme threats must answered by extreme measures. And a former prime minister on a week-long hunger strike is the perfect story to make a huge splash internationally.

You may recall that last December some LMP members chained themselves to the entrance of the parking area reserved for members of parliament. Some members of  DK and eventually of MSZP decided to join them. When the police arrived the whole group, including Ferenc Gyurcsány, was taken to the police station. Because of the presence of the former prime minister the news hit all the major international newspapers. If he hadn’t been there the news would have been a great deal less “interesting.”

This is exactly what happened this time. Just in the English language press I found sixty-four articles while searching for “Gyurcsány.” The Hungarian media is mostly making a joke out of it, and what I found interesting is that the so-called “liberal” media are a great deal more critical than the right-wing papers and blogs. The latter are often only jovial. A local paper from the County of Bács came out with the headline: “Feri is on hunger strike for a week” and kept calling him “the Feri of the country.” Feri is the nickname for Ferenc. Another paper from the County of Hajdu made snide remarks about “a very rich businessman on a hunger strike.” The far-right Echo TV introduced the news with a slang expression: “Gyurcsányék sátorba cuccoltak, és koplalnak” (Gyurcsány and his friends put their stuff into a tent and are starving). The spokeswoman for Fidesz made jokes about four guys sleeping in the same tent.

On the other hand, some of the so-called liberal bloggers were outright vicious. “Örülünk Vincent” announced that Gyurcsány is already politically dead and “it is not becoming of a dead man to be so frolicky.” The final words of “Vincent” are puzzling. “As I already said, Gyurcsány could make himself useful for the opposition of Orbán only if he were jailed as a political prisoner. We would fight for you, Feri, we would pick up the cobblestones for you and would lay siege to the headquarters of Közgép. Then they would let you rot in jail. You are a symbol, Feri, the symbol of freedom at the wrong time at the wrong place.”

Index is also burying Ferenc Gyurcsány and makes fun of everybody and everything. Nyugat talks about the fretting grandmas who visit Gyurcsány while HVG gleefully announces that there are very few people around and about. Hajdupress, a paper from Eastern Hungary, seems to be sympathetic but finds the whole thing useless. Hunger strikes should last as long as the demands of  the strikers are not met. But then Gyurcsány and his friends would die of hunger because the registration is coming regardless. So, let’s not do anything.

There is talk about everything except the reason for the hunger strike. If the bill on the election law includes registration and if the results are detrimental to the opposition, then perhaps the liberal press will not be so delighted as it seems now. Only one former MSZP MP, József Karsai, came to Gyurcsány’s rescue even though Karsai was known for his very populist opposition to Gyurcsány when he was prime minister. “Ferenc Gyurcsány is right on the question of registration,” Karsai announced.

I think it is time to wake up before it’s too late. And let’s not make a joke out of everything. The situation is not funny.

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95 comments

  1. Kingfisher :

    I agree it isn’t necessary but I don’t see it as ushering in a one-party state and certainly, not something to hunger strike about.

    But if it isn’t necessary one has to ask: why? And the answers to that might be rather sinister.

  2. center_left :
    @Eva
    “As is well known for the readers of Hungarian Spectrum I sympathize with Gyurcsány’s ideas.”
    You are just another communist no different from your war criminal buddy Bela Biszku.

    And you are just an other idiot, who buys into the Fidesz propaganda with no thinking power of his/her own. Can you tell me about Orban’s KISZ membership? How about Kover’s involvement? Can you tell us how the current Fidesz members achieved that many Hungarian could not at the time, like scholarships in the West, and extensive travels. Can you tell us about Csurka III/III. We are listening with great interest.

  3. Kingfisher :
    Eva, you have to register in some form or another in most countries. Here in the UK, you have to put yourself on the electoral register. I don’t have any problem with that. How is what Lazar announced yesterday significantly different? I agree it isn’t necessary but I don’t see it as ushering in a one-party state and certainly, not something to hunger strike about.

    You see, this is the problem. People do not understand the difference between the western style registration and the Made in Hungary style registration, and no hunger strike will help with the narrow mindedness. I honestly do not mean to insult you Kingfisher, but you have to compare the two-three ideas to see the difference, and not just take the two word “electoral registration”.

  4. Some1, imagine I know nothing about Hungary. Explain to me, based on what has actually been announced, what the proposal is and why it is sinister. The only argument is the syllogism: Orbán is sinister, Orbán proposed this idea, therefore the idea is sinister. But based on what we know, please make out a case against it.

  5. Kingfisher, read my reply above… there is more in there that Orban is sinister. Why do you think it is a good idea to make everybody pre-register… TWICE?

  6. Some1, I understand your point, and I do not think that I am a particularly great supporter of Ferenc Gyurcsany, but judging from the reaction of e. g. the press, I wonder why he is still relevant. Why is this hunger strike important at all? Apparently because not many have been able so far to rise to the challenge of OV and his forradalom. So if this reaction of the public was predictable

  7. this is because the (even more) pathetic state of the other opponents of OV is so well-known. But that is difficult to conceal anyway.

  8. An – in the UK we have a slightly odd system of registration due to our silly first-past-the-post system (which, incidentally, Orbán seems to be moving towards) and because we don’t have ID cards. Because the election is based on constituencies alone (no proportional element), the address you are registered at is key (if you are not registered at an address in the constituency, you can’t vote).

    The result is an annual check on all addresses. You get a card through the post which lists who’s registered at your address and you then confirm or correct, as appropriate (you can confirm online). Amazingly, this used to be done by people calling on you and filling the card in themselves – imagine how much that exercise cost – and how long it took!

    If you move, you can register yourself in your new constituency, or wait for the annual check – depending on how close the next election is. There is a cut-off point before elections, so if you aren’t registered by then, you can’t vote.

    By and large, this system seems to work, in that most people who are eligible to vote, actually get the chance to vote (should they care to get off the backsides and actually do their civic duty). But, of course, this system tends to miss out on the young, poor, uneducated, etc, as they are the most likely not to bother to register or not to understand how the system works (this is where the old system of personal visits worked much better).

    A much better system would be ID card based (assuming your address was part of the data on the card), but there’s about as much chance of us getting ID cards as there is of OV sending GF a Christmas card!

    In Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland, they now have semi-proportional electoral systems for their own parliaments, and I don’t know if this affects the method of voter registration, but I’ve not heard/read anything about it. And, of course, our EU elections are supposed to be proportional, but, being bloody-minded British, we got round that by having multiple MEPs elected from super-constituencies – so where you live is still the key.

    One last point – I suspect this ‘system’ is still locally based, i.e. each town hall keeps its own voter registration database, so I doubt there is actually a national registration system in reality. (So could you register in several different places and vote more than once? I’ve no idea!) The register is available at local libraries for anyone to view and (I think) is also sold to companies for commercial use (these days you can opt out of the public register), political parties certainly have access to it for canvassing, etc.

  9. Kingfisher :
    Some1, imagine I know nothing about Hungary. Explain to me, based on what has actually been announced, what the proposal is and why it is sinister. The only argument is the syllogism: Orbán is sinister, Orbán proposed this idea, therefore the idea is sinister. But based on what we know, please make out a case against it.

    Dear Kingfisher, Read back on this blog as the differences between the various registrations have been discussed at various times in depth. In Canada, you register once, and if for some reason you are not on the voter’s list it is darn easy to register in the spot. All the money that Orban spends on his mailings could buy a very decent voting system.
    If you want MY opinion, Orban and his buddies stated a few times that they try to create a database on people (who prefers Fidesz, etc.), all the number coded questionaries that were sent out to each voting household can be easily traced back to the each sender. I think those who prefer Fidesz will be reminded very often to pre-register, while those with other preferences will be kind of forgotten.

  10. An :
    @Paul: Interesting IRA reference… Do you suggest Gyurcsany should get more radical?

    Not a chance, An. He’s too soft and too rich. It sums up the sheer impotency of the Hungarian ‘opposition’ in that Gy is probably their most radical member.

    As I’m always saying on here, the opposition needs to fight OV properly – proper demos, strikes, civil disobedience, underground publications and radio, the whole works. The time has long passed for speeches, cosy demos and week-long ‘hunger strikes’.

    It’s so sad that the country that once stood up so bravely against the might of the USSR in 56 now just buries its collective head and does nothing.

  11. oneill – September 11, 2012 at 5:01 am | #34

    (not quoting in full to save space!)

    Thanks for your post, it saved me having to write much the same thing (and probably at greater length!).

    I only referred to the Sands case to make a point about what a real hunger strike is (as opposed to Gy’s silly stunt) – and, with my second post, to make the point that how often tradgedy results from jobsworths refusing to move on the most minor (and often reasonable) of points. But if anyone thinks that Sands’ strike and death didn’t have an impact, they’re not reading their history. (Whether or not it was worth it is a very different issue.)

  12. Kingfisher’s point (as I understand it) is not whether or not voter registration can be done better or worse, it’s the lazy assumption that ‘we’ make that, because OV is doing it, it must be evil.

    I actually share that assumption – I think almost everything OV does is likely to be evil! But Kingfisher’s argument is that we have no actual evidence either that his intention is evil, or indeed that changing the registration system will actually produce pro-Orbán results.

    Personally, whether I agree with them or not, I am very grateful for posters such as Kingfisher and oneill (to name just two). We need posters who keep us on our toes, who stop this just turning into a mindless anti-Orbán-fest. Without the grit, there is no pearl.

  13. @Paul: Well, the evidence will come at the elections, showing historically low turnout figures. Sure, we can sit and wait to see that.

  14. First of all I am upset that they want to strike on the seventh day also. The seventh day should be the day of rest.

    I still do not agree on the sinister description for the registration. In Ohio I have to register and I also have to register my party affiliation (or claim to be independent) for voting in primary (party selective) elections.

    Additionally, the only (and major) electoral fraud in Hungary was committed by the MKP (whose eventual descendant is the MSzP) with the “blue ballots”

  15. @Paul: Re: Hungarians and 56…As much as a share your indignation about the lack of action against OV, I think in some ways it was a lot “easier” for Hungarians to reach the revolting point in 1956 (and even then it took several years to reach that point). The differences:

    1. Oppressive foreign power with military presence in the country in 56 vs. a home-grown undemocratic regime (if you look at history, Hungarians have a stellar, though unsuccessful, record of revolting against foreign occupation)
    2. Clear “hard” dictatorship (people jailed and executed) in 56 vs. the soft, sneaky type OV is establishing in Hungary, partly because Hungary is part of the EU. He is pushing the boundaries, but only so far he can OPENLY go…he has to revert to covert tactics and deception, abusing existing democratic practices to his advantage, sneakily changing rules but keeping the “democratic look” on the surface. It is a lot more difficult to revolt against such a deceptive regime.

  16. An: “I have just registered in Ohio and nobody wanted to know my party affiliation…”

    Just wait until you try to vote in a primary election. For general elections it is not required.

  17. An: “Don’t mix primary elections into this. Louis, no such thing exists in Hungary.”

    The issue is whether your party affiliation is known or not. When you will vote in the first primary, they will ask for party affiliation, which is entered in the precinct records. Thereafter you can be a “registered” democrat, republican or other party or independent. Apparently you will be voting for a first time in Ohio for this general election. You will face the rest of it for primary elections.

    Of course if you never vote in Primary then it is more difficult to find open party affiliation.

  18. Kingfisher :
    Some1, imagine I know nothing about Hungary. Explain to me, based on what has actually been announced, what the proposal is and why it is sinister. The only argument is the syllogism: Orbán is sinister, Orbán proposed this idea, therefore the idea is sinister. But based on what we know, please make out a case against it.

    The registration very likely will increase the number of FIDESZ votes. Because Orban’s brainwashed turul troopers will register in higher numbers. Orban knows. He told us the that we are half-Asians, that is is we have no initiative, we follow. So this is to reap the results of the goebbelsian lying campaign in Hungary since 2006. The 500 thousand peace marchers will register first. Brainwash and fantasize the dumb masses then require them to declare their will to vote. The whole Orban empire is built on the fact that Hungarians are not the smartest creatures.

    So it is sinister because it works differently on the Hungarian population. And if they make it difficult, like country people will have to travel to the cities to stand in line in person for two hours that it will mean even less registrations. The only way to turn this agains them is a very strong campaign to get the voters out to register. Because high number of registrations will kill the FIDESZ.

    By the way I think it should be mandatory with a 10,000 HUF fine. That works.

    I don’t want to kick the dead horse anymore but let me return to Gyurcsany for a sec. What he is doing now is wrong for the same reason. It is f*ng doesn’t matter how good guy he is. The sheep don’t follow a “loser”. It doesn’t matter why he lost. That’s why it is impractical to campaign with Gyurcsany. Bad marketing. Hungarians follow for the winner image.

    On the SNL there was a parody about marketing when they wanted to introduce the Mother Theresa Beer. The catchphrase was “A beer like nun other”. Gyurcsany is something like this.

  19. Tibor :
    The hunger strike will go nowhere, just a stunt for publicity that’s all.

    Tibor with all due respect, I do not think Gyurcsany need publicity for his own good. Fidesz on the other hand breaths publicity. THeir whole machine works on constant public statements often at the same time by two different officials, and they opposite of each others. THe best example is the recent Azerbaijan fiasco. Please read the last weeks posts, as it seems that you missed it on the regular news.

  20. Coming from another EU country with mandatory voter registration, I’ll second the idea that the concept itself won’t raise much fuss abroad.

    However the devil is in the details. *All* political parties must have access to the lists whenever they want to. This way they can launch their own registration campaigns several months before the election, targeting for instance supposedly friendly areas where they feel they could motivate non-voting citizens to register… and obviously to support them later on.

    My guess is that’s what’s in the mind of Fidesz here. Then again, providing all parties have access to the lists, I’d say it’s a fair game.

  21. London Calling!

    And another thing!

    The right to protest is an important element of democracy.

    In England it is free – the thought of having to pay is so anti – democratic that it beggars belief that the Hungarian government don’t understand this.

    (I was going to mention our case of Brian Haw – but it is about as relevant as Bobby Sands – and this is about Hungary!)

    (Yes of course you may have to register any protest near Parliament with the police – but they can’t just say no – and they can’t charge you for practising democracy!)

    László Kövér charging 130,000F for this protest shows a naive understanding of equality and fairness in a democracy.

    Still democracy is still young and inexperienced too it seems – and if Fidesz can make a fast buck then why not sell the gold in St Steven’s crown? Why not get János Lázár renting out Parliament for weddings? I’m still surprised he has not yet started to gamble the Central Bank reserves to make a fast buck there.

    And protesting in Hungary is a privilege reserved for the wealthy?

    Regards

    Charlie

  22. London Calling!

    And ANOTHER another thing (sorry).

    I’m jumping the gun here.

    If Fidesz are going to win anyway – and it’s a separate calculation – then what’s to stop the opposition (finally!) coming together to boycott the registration process?

    The embarrassment – not to mention the International outrage – would be enormous.

    A (very) low percentage turnout with a 99% vote for Fidesz!

    Would look like the voting system in North Korea!

    Yes Kim il Orban!

    Very interesting times!

    Regards

    Charlie

  23. This new “registration” is absolutely unnecessary – so the question is : What does Fidesz expect to gain from it ???

    I’ve written about this before (methinks) regarding the elections for the EU parliament. Then I got a letter asking me if I wanted to vote – they’d have to write then to my “first home address” in Germany, so I would be taken off the voter list there – you’re not supposed to vote twice: “One man one vote”.

    So obviously every possible voter is registered already, including those people like me who have a “secondary home address” here in Hungary – I don’t know the correct term for that.

    It seems you can have only one first or primary address, and you’re not allowed by the EU to register a car on your second (or third …) address …

    PS:

    I was allowed to vote in the local elections here in Hungary – so I voted twice: Once for our mayor in my German home town (a prominent member of the Green party btw) and once for the mayor in the Hungarian village where we live part-time

  24. CharlieH :
    London Calling!
    And ANOTHER another thing (sorry).
    I’m jumping the gun here.
    If Fidesz are going to win anyway – and it’s a separate calculation – then what’s to stop the opposition (finally!) coming together to boycott the registration process?
    The embarrassment – not to mention the International outrage – would be enormous.
    A (very) low percentage turnout with a 99% vote for Fidesz!
    Would look like the voting system in North Korea!
    Yes Kim il Orban!
    Very interesting times!
    Regards
    Charlie

    “What’s to stop the opposition…?”—+(“Ahh, you bloggers are so innocent.)

    Answer: One or two well placed bribes, that’s all.

  25. CharlieH :
    London Calling!
    And another thing!
    The right to protest is an important element of democracy.
    In England it is free – the thought of having to pay is so anti – democratic that it beggars belief that the Hungarian government don’t understand this.
    (I was going to mention our case of Brian Haw – but it is about as relevant as Bobby Sands – and this is about Hungary!)
    (Yes of course you may have to register any protest near Parliament with the police – but they can’t just say no – and they can’t charge you for practising democracy!)
    László Kövér charging 130,000F for this protest shows a naive understanding of equality and fairness in a democracy.
    Still democracy is still young and inexperienced too it seems – and if Fidesz can make a fast buck then why not sell the gold in St Steven’s crown? Why not get János Lázár renting out Parliament for weddings? I’m still surprised he has not yet started to gamble the Central Bank reserves to make a fast buck there.
    And protesting in Hungary is a privilege reserved for the wealthy?
    Regards
    Charlie

    @ “…naive understnding..”

    No, sir, YOU are the naive one. Democracy in the wilds of Hungary is not what it was in the hills of Greece or in the refined circles of London, Ottawa or Washington. It’s just a name behind
    which Hungarians operate no differently than they did during communist times. Orban, Kover, et.all. have a Machievellian
    understanding of Power–those who have it get to use it, and the
    right or wrong of it is academic questions left to professors to argue over in the years to come.

  26. Furthermore,

    the Amrican notion of exporting Democracy was a wild misconception–as if it was a product that one could send
    over like 100 boxes of Twix. Sorry, the preconditions for
    a society to function in a Democracy takes years and years of development…the notion of the good of the community; of obligations above self-interest; of inalienable rights. None of these are present in Hungarian society. Democracy? “O” says Mr. Mustache,”we get to vote, that must be what democracy is!”

    Not by a long shot. And Hungary is a little–a very little–better prepared for it than Iraq or Afghanistan.

  27. London Calling!

    Petofi:

    (“Ahh, you bloggers are so innocent.)

    No, sir, YOU are the naive one.

    Petofi! – Don’t hold back! Say what you mean!!

    Your entries are certainly entertaining! – Don’t change!

    Regards

    Charlie

  28. Petofi, what do you mean by “Americans exporting democracy”? In the case of Hungary, we were told it is the Hungarians who demand it. Nobody ‘forced’ them.

  29. @Louis Kovach, the problem is that you use facts give a false impression. You wrote in your original post, “I still do not agree on the sinister description for the registration. In Ohio I have to register and I also have to register my party affiliation (or claim to be independent) for voting in primary (party selective) elections.”

    In Ohio you don’t have to register your party affiliation, unless you want to participate in the primary (within party) elections that parties use to nominate their candidate for President, for example. Even in that case you want to participate in the primaries, you have an option to choose independent. So the precinct will have the information on your party affiliation, if you voluntarily give it to them. You don’t HAVE TO do that unless you choose to (not even if you want to vote in the primaries, as you can register as “independent”). For general elections, you need to register (without stating party affiliations), but if you meet certain conditions (voted within x number of years) and did not move, you only need to do it once.

    You choose to compare apples to oranges, as the Hungarian system does not have primaries and, unlike the US, Hungary already has a record of eligible voters in each district at the local governments. Additional registration to vote for Hungarians living in Hungary is absolutely unnecessary.

    Obviously, there is nothing sinister about the US registration system. But that doesn’t mean that all registration systems are created equal. Just because the US uses a registration system, and uses it in a certain way, it does not mean that the planned Hungarian registration system is OK.

  30. Kirsten :
    Petofi, what do you mean by “Americans exporting democracy”? In the case of Hungary, we were told it is the Hungarians who demand it. Nobody ‘forced’ them.

    And what on earth were they demanding? Do they teach the Declaration of Independence? How many university students have read “Democracy in America”? Has that shmuck who wrote the new constitution on the train to Budapest…had he consulted the Hamilton/Hay papers or those of Thomas Jefferson? What understanding, if any, do Hungarians
    actually have of what DEMOCRACY IS, AND WHAT IT ENTAILS?

    (How’s that, Charlie?)

  31. Petofi, in very broad terms I agree with you. But I can tell you that I hear from Germans, West, born and educated in democratic times, that “current democracy is the rule of the majority”, all institutions are “democratic” (the judiciary or monetary policy must however be “independent” and that still somehow counts as “democratic” – but why exactly: who knows!?). I am not sure how widely known the Federalists are etc. What I want to say is that this is apparently not crucial. It is crucial for those who are active in the political business and favour democracy, and who shape the political system. What people generally should know is that they want a number of rights and freedoms, and that they will become active to ensure that these rights and freedoms indeed have meaning.

    But despite this unfortunate episode with OV, I generally do not think that the situation in Hungary is so specific when compared with other countries in the region. I do not think that a general disinterest in democracy is at the root of the problem; and serious weaknesses in the new democracies can be found in many of these countries (not only because of the rampant corruption). What makes Hungary specific is the very complicated relationship that people have to the Kadar times and to MSz(M)P. People from that party were apparently “good enough” in the 1990s, as they were allowed to return to power already in 1994, and they were still “good enough” to win elections in 2002 and 2006. I think that the ex-Communist parties have not managed to become “standard” social democratic parties in any country, the personal etc. connections to Communist times remain a great liability. I doubt that the majority of these people can have a good understanding of “democracy” as they were taught a very specific notion of politics. (Zsuzsa kindly presented this logic to us.) But most people were involved in small or bigger ways, very often without having ever harmed anyone. Accounting for the past is made very difficult by that; people want to make a clear break with the past but at the same time do not see an urgent necessity for that. (They have not suffered as much as people in other countries.) I think that major difficulties stem from this bigger and smaller involvement of all people with the “old” regime, which makes a clear break impossible, and yet people would have liked to arrive at a functioning “democracy”. So political education would of course help, but whether the Declaration of Independence will give good answers to the problems that lead to the many divisions in the Hungarian society, I am not so sure.

  32. As far as I know, the Kadar regime tried to accommodate in some way nearly anybody: the nationalists, democratic opposition etc., in that they were allowed to have platforms, publications of some kind, free travel to the West, but also contact to people from the Communist party and the bureaucrats…

  33. “(I was going to mention our case of Brian Haw – but it is about as relevant as Bobby Sands – and this is about Hungary!)”

    The case of Brian Haw is VERY relevant, as it nicely demonstrates how the much vaunted British ‘democracy’ works in comparison, and how our freedoms are ultimately not worth the paper they aren’t written on. (I won’t go into detail, but, if readers aren’t familiar with this particular traversty, Google is your friend.)

    And in what way wasn’t Bobby Sands relevant to a discussion on hunger strikes?? Can you think, offhand, of a better example to demonstrate the definition?

  34. @Kirsten: The Declaration of Independence

    I gave the American Democracy as an example because it had the most work, written work, done on it. Brit democracy grew over 900 years and is mostly a matter of custom. So really,
    American history and its writings teach democracy best. Think of the Gettysburg Address–that should be must reading worldwide, let alone taught in Hungarian schools.

  35. One justification for voter registration is that it is something that is used in in other countries…
    For those who subscribe to this, here is a cartoon:

    For English speakers, the cartoon reads: “This is really a harmless device; all of its elements are used in the village”

    (The original cartoon refers to the media law).

  36. Does the proposed registration law allow voters to change their party affiliation? Or is it a once-for-all proposition?

  37. @Juile, there is no talk of declaring party affiliation as part of the registration, to my knowledge. Don’t give them ideas, please…. it was our resident troll who brought this up here on this blog.

    I assume you are in the US… in Hungary there are no primaries, as I was trying to explain earlier, so really there is no need for declaring party affiliation.

  38. Hello this is somewhat of off topic but I was wondering if blogs
    use WYSIWYG editors or if you have to manually code with HTML.
    I’m starting a blog soon but have no coding expertise so I wanted to get advice from someone with experience. Any help would be enormously appreciated!

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