Days of protest, but the “Nazi” monument will stand in Budapest

I have been so preoccupied with the election results that I have neglected the recent tug-of-war between the Orbán government and a small group of people who desperately want to prevent the erection of a monument to commemorate the “occupation” of Hungary by German troops on March 19, 1944.

The monument depicts Hungary in the guise of the Archangel Gabriel as an innocent victim of German aggression when, in fact, Hungary was an ally of Nazi Germany. By extension, the present Hungarian government puts the blame for the Hungarian Holocaust entirely on Germany, although they do admit that some civil servants shamefully collaborated with the commandos of Adolf Eichmann. But the Hungarian government is not to be blamed because, with the occupation, Hungary lost its sovereignty. Most historians who are experts on the subject, inside and outside of Hungary, see it differently. So does the Hungarian Jewish community, whose representatives have been trying to have a dialogue with Viktor Orbán: they proposed more appropriate ways to remember the seventieth anniversary of the Hungarian Holocaust. At the end of February there was a short reprieve in the “war of words” between Orbán and the Jewish community when Orbán promised to postpone the erection of the monument and offered to engage in a dialogue sometime after the Easter holidays.

But then came the election, whose results Viktor Orbán described as a resounding victory, and he was again full of energy. Two days after the election workmen appeared on Szabadság tér (Freedom Square) and started building a barrier around the designated site of the monument. Soon enough activists gathered and swore they would take it down. And indeed, in the morning the workmen constructed the wall and in the afternoon the demonstrators took it down. By the second day the demonstrators had the right kind of equipment to do quite a professional job disassembling the barrier. By yesterday, the barrier had gone up six times and come down six times. Someone compared the situation to the famous Hungarian/Romanian folk ballad in which the walls that are built one day by the masons at the Fortress of Deva/Déva are destroyed by the next morning.

While this was going on, about 20 policemen stood idly by until April 14, when several of the organizers were ordered to appear at the police station and charged with defacement of property. The defacement consisted of using spray paint to write messages on the canvas that covered the metal barrier. Included among the people so charged were Zoltán Lovas, a newspaper man; Fruzsina Magyar, wife of Imre Mécs who as a young man was condemned to death after the failed revolution in 1956; and Alice Fried, a Holocaust survivor, whose “graffiti” read: “I survived the Shoa. I still want to live!” Since then Imre Mécs, who “willfully” wrote messages on the canvas, was also charged.

History falsification / spiritual well-poisioning The first on the right is Fruzsina Magyar

History falsification / Spiritual well-poisoning
Fruzsina Magyar is on the far right.

Meanwhile tourists keep inquiring what’s going on and the participants tell them that “the government wants to erect a Nazi monument and the people are protesting.” Of course, it would be far too complicated to explain to these people what is at stake here. The game of erecting and taking down the barrier will go on for a while, but meanwhile the foundation for the enormous statue of Archangel Gabriel is being built. Yes, it must stand just as ordered by the imperious Viktor Orbán. His announced deadline is May 1.

Opponents say that as soon as Viktor Orbán and his government are gone this statue will join the statues erected during the Rákosi and Kádár periods, which are now  in a kind of statue cemetery in Memento Park. Others are certain that the new monument will have to be guarded day and night because it is likely that opponents will deface this monument that they find so objectionable.

The English-language media doesn’t seem to have taken much notice of what’s going on in the heart of Budapest. I discovered only one opinion piece, by András Simonyi, former Hungarian ambassador in Washington, who finds Viktor Orbán “deaf to the uproar by the Jewish community and other decent Hungarians. He fails to show leadership and magnanimity. He is missing the opportunity to behave like a statesman.”  Statesmanship? Magnanimity? From Viktor Orbán?

By contrast, the German press has been covering the story of the monument from the beginning. After all, Germany is implicated in this story. But the Germans, unlike the Hungarians, faced up to their own past and were ready to take the blame. They also know, as do most historians, that the Germans had eager accomplices in the Hungarian Holocaust. German public radio had a segment on the controversy, “Proteste gegen Nazi-Bezatsungsdenkmal.” Yes, the description of it as a Nazi monument is spreading. In it the journalist responsible for the text accurately described the situation that awaited the German troops in Hungary. Junge Welt ran an article entitled “Orbán in the role of the victim.” Perhaps the writer who claimed that Hungarians never quite got over the fact that they lost World War II is right. Seventy years after the fact. It would be high time to do so, but self-examination is impossible as long as the Hungarian government prevents any kind of honest look at Hungary’s role in the Holocaust.

63 comments

  1. Nazi atrocities are part of our collective memory (except in some Muslim countries), and quite rightly so. Many, though not all, send the message that Jews were the primary, perhaps the only, victims. The monument in Budapest is a welcome exception, in that it raises the memory of all victims of the German occupation. Historians everywhere know that after that Sunday in October, Germany treated Hungary as occupied soil. (Being a child of those years, I remember that we in Obuda disliked the Germans and their presence, though of course not as much as we feared and loathed the approaching Red Army.)
    Something this inclusive and comprehensive ought to be welcomes, perhaps even celebrated, not misinterpreted and condemned.

  2. @Andras Boros-Kazai: It sounds as if you want it both ways–Jews as victims, as well as the Hungarians who put them on the railroad cars. I don’t believe that the two sets should be put together and made innocent by the new monument. The new monument makes heroes of a kind of everyone but the Germans. Certainly not to my understanding.

  3. @Boros-Kazai

    Would you look at the official government decree from the official source?

    It is on page 90,100 – the decree of December 31, 2013.

    The government declares the erection of a “memorial to the German occupation of Hungary” of outstanding importance. [sweeping away any local or professional objection]

    There is NO word about victims – Jewish or non-Jewish.

    “A Kormány nemzetgazdasági szempontból kiemelt jelentőségű üggyé nyilvánítja a Magyarország német megszállásának emléket állító, a Budapest V. kerület, 24747/1 és 24747/2 helyrajzi számon nyilvántartott ingatlanon,természetben a Budapest V. kerület Szabadság téren megvalósításra kerülő emlékmű felállításával összefüggő, az 1. mellékletben felsorolt közigazgatási hatósági ügyeket.”

    Click to access MK13225.pdf

    It was much later, when they modified the deadline from March 19 to May 31, that they inserted the “victims”, as an afterthought to calm protests.

    The original and real aim has nothing to do with the memory of any victims – it is to satisfy Nazi elements in the ruling party.

    The memorial with the Nazi eagle will be a gathering point of Nazis all over Europe in the heart of Budapest.

  4. Dear Andras Boros-Kazai, the Germans never treated Hungary as occupied soil and in any case they occupied Hungary on 19th March and not in October 1944. Obviously you were not alive at the time otherwise you would know. I was 18 during the so-called occupation of Hungary and I saw not many German soldiers in the “occupied” Hungary, but saw the Hungarian placards on the street regulating the Jewish population and how day-by-day the persecution by the Hungarian authorities became worse. I also heard that Hungarian Gendarmes marched the Jews in the country to the townships where they were locked into cattle wagons to be taken to Kassa and handed over to the Germans for the final trip to Auschwitz. The yellow star I wore was on my clothing because of Hungarian regulation proclaimed in Hungarian in the Hungarian streets and newspapers.
    German occupation of an innocent Hungary? Who are we kidding, Messrs. Orban and Vona (and Andras Boros-Kazai). When will you ever realise that Hungary was a willing confederate of the Germans in the War and in keeping Hungary Judenfrei? When will you admit that since 1920 to the very last days of the Arrow Cross rule, Horthy and most if not all Hungarians sat on their hands and watched as matters progressed against the Jews until the gas chambers fed by Hungarians but built by the Nazis were killing Jews? Did the Germans force Hungary to have a numerus clausus and the various laws and regulations. What had Germany to do with the deportations which culminated in Kamenetz Podolsk in 1941 or the pogroms of Ujvidek?
    I am 88 now and live far away from Hungary since 1946, but the renewal of the Horthy cult in Hungary fills me with despair for those Hungarian Jews and Gentiles who live in Orbanistan Hungary.

  5. Well, if the children disliked the Germans, then everything is fine. It is unfortunate that the Red Army, even more disliked by the children, advanced so quickly that the Hungarian Judenrein could not be completed, right, Mr. Boros-Kazai?

  6. @Andras:

    Well done, Andras. Typical Bolshevik revisionism.
    Now, please tell us, before it is erased from the history books, did Stalin sign an agreement with Hitler? Was Stalin not happy to carve up eastern Europe? Because, soon enough, we here in Hungary will be forced to learn the great favors of friendship that Russia (ok, Soviet Union) extended to us for all those many years.

    (By the way, as soon as the West applies itself–and present circumstances will certainly
    hurry this on–substitutes for gas and oil will be discovered. Then, Russia, whose only home-produced export is the polonium sandwich, will have no more significance than Zimbabwe.
    Nuclear arms or not, those Russian oligarchs haven’t stolen the country blind for the last 25 years, not to be able to spend their billions in Miami, New York, and Paris. They’ll make sure that the nuclear arms will be secured; and that Russia will go back to its feudal ways quietly.)

  7. As I noted in a January 19 blog note here, the selected sculptor, Peter Parkanyi Raab had already made a memorial to the Nazi writer Albert Wass, who was condemned to death in absentia for the 1940 killing of two Romanian men and two Jewish girls.

    [Let me add, Wass died in comfortable exile in Florida]

    Do you think that it is a coincidence that the promoters of this memorial selected such sculptor for the job?

  8. Come to think of it, one must consider that Orban’s insistence on the monument begins the long-term project of weaning Hungarians off their pro-teutonic stance….and to be replaced, in time, by the great red eagle of the east.

  9. Andras Boros-Kazai :
    Nazi atrocities are part of our collective memory (except in some Muslim countries), and quite rightly so. Many, though not all, send the message that Jews were the primary, perhaps the only, victims. The monument in Budapest is a welcome exception, in that it raises the memory of all victims of the German occupation. Historians everywhere know that after that Sunday in October, Germany treated Hungary as occupied soil. (Being a child of those years, I remember that we in Obuda disliked the Germans and their presence, though of course not as much as we feared and loathed the approaching Red Army.)
    Something this inclusive and comprehensive ought to be welcomes, perhaps even celebrated, not misinterpreted and condemned.

    Nice job of contradicting yourself. Nazi atrocities are part of collective memory, yet you simply disliked them. A person may dislike chickpeas, but they would loath and fear the Nazi atrocities. The Jews of Hungary feared and loathed the Nazis, as any real victims would. How many of your family members were murdered by the Nazis? How many of your family members will be celebrated by this inclusive memorial?

    None of mine, they were given emigration papers by the SS to leave Hungary in the face of the approaching Soviets. My mother was not raped and her brother was not forced to wear a yellow star. Their grandparents were not packed into freight cars and shipped of to their death. The Jewish neighbors, they were not so lucky.

    Misinterpretation? Yes you did. How can you argue that Hungarian Jews were not the primary victims of Nazis in Hungary? You can not. Who argues that the Jews were the only victims? There are memorials to the Roma and homosexuals murdered by the Nazis. There are a multitude of memorials in the US and Europe dedicated to the memory of the allied forces who were victims of Nazi aggression. There are memorials to the soldiers, many of whom were forcibly drafted, that fought in the Hungarian army in allegiance with the Nazis. Who is arguing that the Jews were the only victims? Who can argue that other victims have not been remembered.

    Hungary willingly joined the alliance with Hitler. After the German “occupation” Horthy had the authority and power to stop the deportations, yet he waited until 100,000’s were slaughtered. How was his sovereignty lost (and the Hungarian nation’s sovereignty that he embodied) if he could use his power to stop the deportations after he aided and abetted the murders?

    I will celebrate when that atrocity finds its way to Memento Park. Until then I cheer the acts of civil disobedience on Szabadság tér.

  10. Andras Boros-Kazai :

    Nazi atrocities are part of our collective memory (except in some Muslim countries), and quite rightly so. Many, though not all, send the message that Jews were the primary, perhaps the only, victims. The monument in Budapest is a welcome exception, in that it raises the memory of all victims of the German occupation. Historians everywhere know that after that Sunday in October, Germany treated Hungary as occupied soil. (Being a child of those years, I remember that we in Obuda disliked the Germans and their presence, though of course not as much as we feared and loathed the approaching Red Army.)
    Something this inclusive and comprehensive ought to be welcomes, perhaps even celebrated, not misinterpreted and condemned.

    I fear you got mixed up with the dates. The German occupation took place on March 19 and the Germans were friendly allies. After October 15 it was a different story. Horthy and his family were arrested but not before he appointed Ferenc Szálasi prime minister. The Hungarian army fought with the Germans to the last minute.

  11. steve397 :

    Dear Andras Boros-Kazai, the Germans never treated Hungary as occupied soil and in any case they occupied Hungary on 19th March and not in October 1944. Obviously you were not alive at the time otherwise you would know. I was 18 during the so-called occupation of Hungary and I saw not many German soldiers in the “occupied” Hungary, but saw the Hungarian placards on the street regulating the Jewish population and how day-by-day the persecution by the Hungarian authorities became worse.

    Well, I was only eight but I saw only two German soldiers in 1944 until the Russians occupied Pécs at the end of November. They tried to offer chocolate to me and to my cousin but our mothers called us in. They didn’t want us to accept anything from the soldiers, however well meaning they may have been.

    Otherwise, unfortunately I alsoremember the yellow stars. One of our neighbors had to wear it. .I remember of my mother having a conversation with her while I was so ashamed that I couldn’t lift my eyes. Ilonka néni was a lovely woman and I spent many hours with her and her husband. On top of everything else she was a devout Catholic.

  12. Before any more uninformed Fidesz friends start wit their usual rampage, let me explain something.
    Although Fidesz and Jobbik (coincidentally) tries to portray this “resistance” against this questionable artistic quality of monument as the Jewish population of Hungary does not want to honour other victims of the Second World War, it is far from the truth.
    The Jewish population would totally welcome a monument that would honour all victims of WWII, including gypsies, homosexuals, the mentally ill, artists who created “degenerate” art, Hungarians who tried to save the Jews, Hungarians who were innocently killed by the bombings, and so forth. This should be done with a monument that allegorically or otherwise represents all the victims, but does NOT portrays the perpetrators as one of the victims! THis is the problem. It is not the Jewish population of Hungary that said that Gabriel represents Hungary, it is the Hungarian government said that, and so did the “artist”. If you really want to honour all the victims, you do not put them in the same group as some of the murderers.

    This is the problem, and not a monument, so pleads respond on this thread accordingly!

  13. I estimate that about 75-80% of the Hungarians are as gently easily confused souls as our one pro-statue contributor.

    How can we shed light in these dark brains without making them very defensive, angry, stubborn, and lost to the cause of the Enlightenment?

    Maybe, we should stick to utility rate discounts.

  14. I would like to point out that the modified decree (promulgated on February 19) names the person responsible to finish the memorial in time.

    It is the “Miniszterelnökséget vezető államtitkár”, Orban’s right hand man, Janos Lazar.

    p. 2478

    Click to access MK14024.pdf

  15. 1.
    Matolcsy spends 90 billion forints of the money of the Hungarian National Bank on purchasing real estate.

    see p.24

    2.
    The Board of Outside Directors [is this the right term?] criticizes this and other programs [like buying a Guarneri violin] as outside the scope of the Bank.

    p. 25

    Click to access 13816.pdf

    3.
    Mr Rona, a member of the board gives an interview on television.
    He tells the audience, that the Bank, chaired by Matolcsy goes ahead
    with the programs in spite of the Board’s objections.

    http://www.atv.hu/videok/video-20140416-rona-peter

    4.
    Internet portal index.hu reports details with the headline
    “National Bank gives money to friends without control”

    http://index.hu/gazdasag/2014/04/16/mnb-csr/

    5.
    National Bank indicates it will sue the portal

  16. Here is a piece of juicy detail from the article in index.hu.

    In January, the Bank set aside 4 million euros for the Guarneri.

    But the auctioneers say it is worth no more than 0.2 million euros.

  17. Regarding tappanch’s post. I read an article about he subject of Matolcsy’s spending spree earlier on, but what made me laugh out loud was in line with a previous discussion about grammatical errors in official places.
    One of the organization Matolcsy provides support for is called Harom Kiralyfi, Harom Kiralylany (Three Princes, Three Princesses). I have no problem with he organization, and in fact it seems that they reached out to all main Hungarian parties for support. The organization is about helping young people to have large families. It is about family planning, how to, money matters, and it even has a dating component.
    “Celunk, hogy megszulessenek a kivant, tervezett gyermekek.”
    “Our goal is that children who are planned and wanted are born”. I already have a stylistic problem with this, as I am not really sure what is the goal with the children who maybe not planned or not wanted, but that is an other issue.
    The real puzzle although is in the following sentence:
    “Ma Magyarországon a fiatalok 2,4 gyermeket terveznek, de csupán 1,3 születik meg.”
    “These days the young people of Hungary are planning to have 2.4 children, but only 1.3 is born.”
    Never in my life I came across with any person (young or old) who planned on having a fraction child. It sound like something out of an Orkeny piece. You can read some of Orkeny’s gems here: http://www.hlo.hu/news/istvan_orkeny_one_minute_stories)

    If they wish to talk about statistics and averages, they should of just say that versus making up these kind of sentences.

  18. tappanch :
    Here is a piece of juicy detail from the article in index.hu.
    In January, the Bank set aside 4 million euros for the Guarneri.
    But the auctioneers say it is worth no more than 0.2 million euros.

    Most of the money will be stolen. That is clear.

    There is no ascertainable value for a genuine piece of work of art, the Bank and the seller (who will never be made public anyway) will strike a deal and it will be legal. If both parties are on the same ‘side’, both want to create the paperwork behind the scam then there are so many ways to make the transaction legal and unassailable before the court.

    (In this case the fidesz-guy buys the violin for 0.2m euros, gets, just to be on the safe side, two reports from professionals appraisers that it is worth actually 4m euros and then with all the supporting evidence the guy sells the violin to the Bank for 3.8, he was even generous and gave a discount to the nation, all legal).

    I think Fidesz thinks it invented the perpetum mobile or the money printing machine.

    As long as the Bank spends money on assets which can be put into its balance sheet, as opposed to spending money on operational costs which would affect the Bank’s P/L account (although the Bank will sponsor current expenses too at various friendly foundations and institutions which the Bank will have to book as expenses), the Bank can spend as much money as it wants without incurring any losses.

    That is because all what happens is that on the asset side of the balance sheet money/bonds will be exchanged into real estate, paintings, sculptures and other assets, the price of which may be subject to debate, but nobody can conclusively tell that a rare paining is worth 2.5 or 7.5 million euros. At least legally it will be impossible to prove.

    Readers, these are lawyers who are intent on stealing with a parliamentary 2/3s behind them. They know how to make money in a legal ways and will not stop for a second. Why would they? They are certain that Jobbik can be ‘managed’ somehow, that Jobbik’s voters are mostly Fidesz voters in exile and as such are a reserve to Fidesz but unavailable to the left, in other words they are sure Fidesz will remain in power because the left is nowhere, it is divided and and just does not get things anyway. It is thus rational to continue to steal as there is no downside risk. So that is what they are doing.

  19. If somebody reads Hungarian there is now a good article about such deals which the National Bank just stared to do, that is when the two formally ‘opposing’ sides are just stealing money together — and totally legally.

    So much so that the lawyer behind this particular deal (practically representing both sides) is none other than The New Hope, Bence Tuzson (btw, he is also a lawyer). He is a personal protege of Orban.

    This is just a minuscule scam which is worth 490m forints (2.4m USD) of which at least 3/4s were stolen checking out the piece if real estate which one party bought and the other, friendly party sold.

    This is all legal and nobody can do a thing.

    But why would Fidesz stop? People love them and now fideszniks feel even more empowered to steal all the money they can.

    http://index.hu/belfold/2014/04/16/490_millioert_vett_sonak_telket_az_fkf/

  20. tappanch :
    Here is a piece of juicy detail from the article in index.hu.
    In January, the Bank set aside 4 million euros for the Guarneri.
    But the auctioneers say it is worth no more than 0.2 million euros.

    -handling fees

  21. Should’ve known better than to voice a differing opinion on a site I stumbled across. Still, I respectfully suggest that we do not sink to the level of the discourse which regrettably seems to have become the norm in Hungary: Baseless allegation as to one’s political leanings, one’s intelligence, even one’s character and morals. Are those the now-acceptable elements of a serious discussion? Ez is csak egy kispesti kocsma?

    As for the dates, I happen to agree with a fair number of my fellow historians in that that certain Oktober Sunday was far more important a turning point than the formal occupation of Hungary in March.

    And please leave Wass Albert out of this, unless you wish to honor the “courts” that convicted him and thousands of other “liberated” East Europeans, with a number of Jews among them. He may have fallen for a wrong, even evil, ideology, but he had good company. Those were the times when one of the brightest philosophers of the past century wrote Nazi pieces, the cream of French intellectuals sipped champagne with occupying German officers in Paris, and the brilliant American poet broadcast Fascist exhortation from Rome.

  22. @Albert Wass

    Randolph Braham: A Magyarországi Holokauszt Földrajzi Enciklopédiája

    (Geographical Encyclopedia of the Holocaust in Hungary)

    p. 1119

    Vasasszentgotthárd, Szolnok-Doboka megye

    “There were 12 Jewish in the village in 1941.
    […]
    The incoming Hungarian army shot several local people to death in the Fall of 1940,

    including two Jewish girls: Eszter & Róza Mihály, who were visitors from Csicsógyörgyfalva

    and were staying in the house of their brother-in-law, Jakab Rosenberg. According to the

    local people, the two girls and two local Romanian youth were executed at the order of

    Count Albert Wass and his father Count Endre Wass by the unit led by first lieutenant

    Pakucs.”

  23. Is this the new Wass-apologist?

    http://www.beloit.edu/polisci/faculty/
    An excerpt:
    “Andras Boros-Kazai is a native of Budapest, Hungary. He came to the United States in 1957 and earned his citizenship with five years of service in the U.S. Army (three of which he spent in Southeast Asia). He majored in English and Political Science at Kent State University and the University of Pittsburgh while working full-time as a concrete-maker, administrative assistant, bartender and jazz drummer. He earned graduate training in Area Studies at Indiana University, and earned a Ph.D. in History in 1982. Since 1975, Andras has taught courses in revolution, empire and ethnicity-nationalism, Central European, Central Asian and Balkan history, film in the socio-historical context as well as Hungarian language and culture at Indiana University, Ohio Northern University, University of South Dakota and at Defense Intelligence Institutions. …”

  24. Andras Boros-Kazai :
    Those were the times when one of the brightest philosophers of the past century wrote Nazi pieces, the cream of French intellectuals sipped champagne with occupying German officers in Paris, and the brilliant American poet broadcast Fascist exhortation from Rome.

    Nobody in these countries is honoring those guys as victims. In France, the memory of those who were condemned after the end of the war is still heavily tainted (which doesn’t prevent anybody from appreciating the genuine talent of some).

    Eva S. Balogh :
    Perhaps the writer who claimed that Hungarians never quite got over the fact that they lost World War II is right. Seventy years after the fact. It would be high time to do so, …

    Getting over losing the First World War could be a start…

  25. Grammatical correction:

    The former pupils of the Jewish Elementary School of Óbuda bear witness to the events of 1941-44.

    “I did not see armed Germans, there were always Hungarian policemen, “csendőr”s and “nyilas”s.”

  26. Andras Boros-Kazai :
    Should’ve known better than to voice a differing opinion on a site I stumbled across. Still, I respectfully suggest that we do not sink to the level of the discourse which regrettably seems to have become the norm in Hungary: Baseless allegation as to one’s political leanings, one’s intelligence, even one’s character and morals. Are those the now-acceptable elements of a serious discussion? Ez is csak egy kispesti kocsma?
    As for the dates, I happen to agree with a fair number of my fellow historians in that that certain Oktober Sunday was far more important a turning point than the formal occupation of Hungary in March.
    And please leave Wass Albert out of this, unless you wish to honor the “courts” that convicted him and thousands of other “liberated” East Europeans, with a number of Jews among them. He may have fallen for a wrong, even evil, ideology, but he had good company. Those were the times when one of the brightest philosophers of the past century wrote Nazi pieces, the cream of French intellectuals sipped champagne with occupying German officers in Paris, and the brilliant American poet broadcast Fascist exhortation from Rome.

    Dear Prof. Boros-Kazai,

    Please kindly read the linked article. It is in Hungarian, I dared to assume you can read it.

    It gives the historical context to the German occupation memorial.

    Sincerely,

    M

    http://hvg.hu/velemeny/20140121_Az_eleven_borzalom

  27. The chief editor of the magazine Public Service wrote such a sycophant article about Orban on April 10 that Rakosi would be ashamed by its cult of personality.

    http://kozszolgalat.kormany.hu/bekoszono-2014-aprilis

    Let me copy it here, before a soul-searching Orban orders its removal.

    ” Sajnos nem ismerem személyesen. Persze szeretném, de hát ki ne szeretné. Idei március 15-i beszéde után ismét melegség töltötte el a lelkemet, mint minden beszéde végén, és nem feltétlenül az elmondottak miatt, hiszen azok egyértelműek, hanem azért, ahogyan minden egyes alkalommal szemöldökét felhúzva, fejét kissé zavartan lehajtva, papírjait rendezgetve igyekszik leplezni meghatottságát. Merthogy meghatódik… Most, a választások után, amikor soraimat olvassák, „egységbe forrott erőinknek” köszönhetően már büszkén mondhatom, hogy kicsiny, de egyre erősebb hazám miniszterelnöke változatlanul a nagyon is emberi Orbán Viktor.

    Nem tudom, miként éli hétköznapjait, hiszen hogyan is tudnám, de amit a médián keresztül látni enged az átlagember számára, pontosan olyan, mint amilyen az ország első emberétől elvárható, mintha minden nap Seneca intelmei szerint cselekedne: „Ne feledd: emberhez méltóan kell élned, hogy méltó légy e magas cím viselésére… Hívd segítőtársul a bölcsességet. Ha tógájába burkolózol, megóv a bajoktól, szentélyében biztonságra lelsz… Élj nemes szívvel, és élj egyenes lélekkel! Parádé nélkül, gyűlölködés nélkül élni – íme: tiéd a boldog élet.”

    Valószínűleg ennek a gondolatiságnak köszönhetően vonzotta magához hasonló lelkületű munkatársait, akiknek segítségével megvalósulhatott vagy elindulhatott az a rengeteg jó intézkedés és kezdeményezés, amelyekkel az elmúlt négy évben határainkon innen és túl is gazdagodtunk, és amelyekkel talán jobbá, emberibbé válhat szűkebb és idővel talán tágabb környezetünk”

    “Remélem írásainkat olvasva meg-megdobban a kedves Olvasó szíve, hogy bizony, magyarnak lenni jó, és ebben az érzésben megnyugodva várhatjuk mindannyian az ünnepek ünnepét, a húsvétot.”

  28. tappanch :
    The European Union financially supports this magazine.
    http://kozszolgalat.kormany.hu/tamogatok

    The EU will of course support/subsidize the municipality projects where Jobbik will win in the autumn municipality elections and which projects in turn will allow Jobbik to finally get its party finances in order.

    In other words the EU will support and enable the entrenchment of a party that is both madly in love with Putin and madly hates the EU.

    (And since the political left will lose badly, as it cannot possibly win any municipalities and thus cannot have access to lavish EU projects, it will be smothered financially as its last remaining sources of party finance will disappear entirely by the end of the year.)

    There are some smart people in Brussels.

  29. I visited the protest last week but in truth, it is so small scale that it is no surprise that the government is hardly feeling threatened by it. If a thousand people turned up, then perhaps it might have some effect. But as we have discovered, Hungarian civic society doesn’t do protests which is why the powers that be get away with so much.

    The Felix Lajko violin story is incredible. There are a number of internationally renowned violinists in Hungary, people like Kristof Baráti and Barnabas Kellemen, and they play on excellent instruments loaned by individuals and institutions who recognise their undisputed artistic excellence. Lajko though is a different kettle of fish. He plays and improvises his own music in a style where a 17th century violin sound is quite inappropriate. When he does try to perform as a classical violinist, he is second-rate which is why no one has ever thought of lending him a top instrument. I’m not knocking him as a performer of his own music, but the violin is wasted on him given what he does with it. Of course, he was born in Serbia so perhaps being a Trianon Hungarian gives him special privileges in the eyes of the Hungarian National Bank.

  30. @Boros-Kazai

    First off, when you chose to honor a Wass Albert at a time when Horthyism and anti-semitism
    is rising like the Pava, then don’t be surprised when you are attacked. Anyway, if you wish to hold your ground, you’ll have to answer people like tappanch who has written on Wass just above…

  31. I must protest about a contribution by Tapanch, which quotes some words of **** Ildiko at “http://kozszolgalat.kormany.hu/bekoszono-2014-aprilis” and which almost made me sick. At my age these types of writings should be avoided, especially for people like the me who, having left his beloved country in 1946 is not used to similar style used during the times of the Communist regime and thus missed out on reading in similar vein the qualities of the best pupil of Stalin, Lenin and others.

    Please Tapanch be more considerate to us oldies.

  32. steve397 :

    I must protest about a contribution by Tapanch, which quotes some words of **** Ildiko at “http://kozszolgalat.kormany.hu/bekoszono-2014-aprilis” and which almost made me sick. At my age these types of writings should be avoided, especially for people like the me who, having left his beloved country in 1946 is not used to similar style used during the times of the Communist regime and thus missed out on reading in similar vein the qualities of the best pupil of Stalin, Lenin and others.

    Please Tapanch be more considerate to us oldies.

    This piece of writing is more befitting the Rákosi regime than Kádár’s. Kádár had more sense than that. He learned something from Rákosi’s fate.

  33. Education is a helpful tool. The majority of Hungarians do not get enough of it.

    I am reading the naive words of orban loyalists among the Hungarian emigrants in America, and hear their praises for the Fidesz rule.

    Facts don’t count.

    The dangerous glory projected by Orban is sweet music to them.

    Orban’s Kadarist Kisz past is forgiven. Hungarians should be objective on these sudden ideological converts from Kadarist loyalism to Christian patriotism.

    The Hungarian standard of living is dropping while the fortunes of the elite rulers in Fidesz are multiplying.

  34. Gretchen :

    @Andras Boros-Kazai: It sounds as if you want it both ways–Jews as victims, as well as the Hungarians who put them on the railroad cars. I don’t believe that the two sets should be put together and made innocent by the new monument. The new monument makes heroes of a kind of everyone but the Germans. Certainly not to my understanding.

    The number of non-Jewish victims after German troops’ arrival in Hungary was zero if we think in terms of people killed. There were some who were arrested and perhaps later perished in Germany. But in comparison to the Hungarian Jewish losses the numbers were negligible.

  35. What about Roma? I’ve heard conflicting claims. Years ago, I was given a document to translate that claimed something like 20 000 Romas were killed but I’ve also seen more recent statements refuting this.

  36. tappanch :
    Who had a stadium built next to his house from taxpayers’ money?
    http://444.hu/assets/felcsut_11.jpg

    What’s the big deal?
    In America, the wealthy build their homes on golf courses. Viktor tried golf, but the ball was too small and hard: every time he kicked it, it hurt his toes…so he gave it up. Anyway, the Russians don’t know from golf so what good would it have been?

  37. That’s the difference between capitalism in the USA and Hungary:

    In the USA rich people give millions of $$$ for a good cause, whether it’s a stadium or a hospital, a university building or whatever to get their name on it – but they use their own money!

    In Hungary politicians (mis)use the people’s money to build useless things to get their name on them …

  38. Requirements for Democracy:

    –Debate
    –Accomodation
    –Hard-bargaining but Fair Play
    –Respect
    –Self-Respect

    Fidesz score: 0

  39. Well wolfi here in the USA the rich and even the moderately wealthy need the tax breaks that come with the gifts to not for profit entities. Our tax code promotes this and its one of the more progressive features of it. The other big difference is the level of wealth in the USA as compared to Hungary. For example the estimated net worth of Bill Gates is $75,007,873,548, Sándor Demján is Hungary’s richest man, with assets of HUF 260 billion (USD 1.45 billion), according to the list of the country’s 100 richest people compiled by Napi Gazdaság. According the data I have seen the USA has 371 individuals worth more than 1 billion dollars.

    There is no comparison between the rich here and the rich in Hungary.

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